• Anonymous

Just Diagnosed with Alzheimer’s

The diagnosis of Alzheimer’s or another dementia may impact how you see yourself. Only you can decide how much you will allow the disease to be part of who you are. The Alzheimer’s Association provides the following tips on how you can see you are more than your diagnosis:


Receiving a diagnosis of Alzheimer's is never easy — it's life changing. It is normal to experience a range of emotions. Acknowledging your feelings can be an empowering first step in coping with the challenges ahead.

Emotions you may have

You noticed symptoms. You made a doctor's appointment. You took tests. And you felt a roller coaster of emotions — fear, hope, despair, denial. Then you received a diagnosis. You may have felt numb, unsure of how to respond or where to turn.


You also may be grieving over the present losses you are experiencing, or the expectation of future changes as the disease progresses. It can be helpful to identify and understand some of the emotions you may experience after receiving your diagnosis.


These emotions may include:

  • Anger. Your life is taking a different course than the one you and your family had planned. You cannot control the course of the disease.

  • Relief. The changes you were experiencing were cause for concern. A diagnosis validated these concerns by assigning a name to your symptoms.

  • Denial. The diagnosis seems impossible to believe. You may feel overwhelmed by how your life will change as a result of Alzheimer's.

  • Depression. You may feel sad or hopeless about the way your life is changing.

  • Resentment. You may be asking yourself what you did to deserve your diagnosis or why this is happening to you and not someone else.

  • Fear. You may be fearful of the future and how your family will be affected.

  • Isolation. You may feel as if no one understands what you're going through or lose interest in maintaining relationships with others.

  • Sense of loss. It may be difficult to accept changes in your abilities.

If these feelings linger week after week, you may be dealing with depression or anxiety. Feeling depressed or anxious about your diagnosis is common, but both can be successfully treated.


Taking care of your emotional needs

Coming to terms with your diagnosis and the emotions you are feeling will help you accept your diagnosis, move forward, and discover new ways to live a positive and fulfilling life.


You are the only person who can change how you feel about your diagnosis. So it's important to find healthy ways to deal with your emotions. This can be difficult at the beginning. But once you make the commitment to take care of your emotional needs, you may find that you can rise to the challenge and face your diagnosis. This is a new phase of your life, and you can choose to experience it with sense of connection to your emotional health.


You are not alone

A diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease can leave you feeling disconnected, isolated or abandoned from others. You may feel unsure of where to turn and that no one can possibly understand what you're going through. People living with early-stage Alzheimer's have stated that one of the most important lessons they learned early on in their diagnosis is this: They could not just wait for others to help them — they had to go out and help themselves to the best of their ability.


Whenever facing difficult times, having a good support network you can turn to for advice and encouragement may help you feel socially connected and give you a sense of belonging and purpose. Make sure your network includes other people who are living in the early stage of the disease. Connecting with others like you may help put your own experiences living with the disease in perspective, and provide you with the support and encouragement necessary to move beyond your diagnosis.


Questions for your doctor

After receiving your diagnosis, it's normal to leave your doctor's office unsure of what questions to ask. You just received life-changing news, and you need time to absorb this information and understand what it means for you and your family.


Your doctor is an important member of your care team. Use the opportunity to ask your doctor questions about your diagnosis, all the available options, and the benefits and risks of each choice you make.


You may be asking: "How do I know what to ask my doctor?" Download a PDF of example questions as a resource.


Source: Alzheimer's Association®

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